Life, Love, Adventure

My Quest to Erase the Stigma of Mental Illness

About

I have been living with Bipolar Disorder for 30 years. My mission is to help put an end to the stigma of mental illness by sharing my story in the hopes of providing insight into what it’s like to cope with and overcome this illness.  I am the mother of two incredible boys ages 11 and 13 and wife of an amazingly supportive husband. Together we travel the country every summer in search of adventure, organize anti bullying assemblies that the boys and their band perform at elementary schools and pursue our passion of helping others through music and writing. I am a fourth grade teacher who hopes to be an example of how it is possible to deal with illness and lead a productive, meaningful life. I pray my story inspires and encourages empathy and acceptance. Thank you for joining me on this journey! You can contact me at:  maotribe@gmail.com.

 

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7 thoughts on “About

  1. Hello Dee

    I’m Naoko from Japan
    I’m a mother of two girls. 17,22
    They are great kids.

    Thank you so much for your courage and love.

    Your willingness to be a tool of God. And your aspirations to make the most of what you have gone through for the good of the world.
    I was able to feel that. And it brought so much strength.

    I don’t want my illness to be the cop out for running.
    I want to lead a life in a way only l who has this illness can do.

    I’m looking forward to your future posting.

    Actually I haven’t started the medical treatment for bipolar yet.
    I got this diagnosis 2weeks ago.

    Still lots of part of me can not accept what I heard.

    I’m debating whether or not to start meds
    It would be helpful if you have some advice.

    Love
    Naoko

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Naoko! So nice to hear from you especially all the way from Japan! THank you for your kind words, they are very encouraging to me. I know it’s hard to receive this diagnosis, but part of me was relieved because it explained so much and I was then able to research and become more understanding of how I felt. I also struggled very much with starting to take meds. I had never taken meds for anything and I felt like it was a sign of weakness. But I finally realized that it’s a good thing for me and once I found the correct meds I really felt a difference. THat’s not to say everything is now perfect, but definitely better. I also did a lot of talk therapy to help me understand how to cope with symptoms and accept it. I also talked with my pastors a lot which really helped. Pray about it and know that God will lead you and help you. With the meds, do you have a doctor you feel comfortable with who you can talk to and express concerns? That helped me. I always researched everything I tried and brought ideas to my doctor. There is a good website called Patients Like Me which allows you to track and monitor symptoms and meds that my doctor and I found very helpful. I know it’s hard, especially in the beginning, but you will learn to cope and overcome! Please keep in touch!

      Like

  2. Hello Dee

    I’m Naoko from Japan
    I’m a mother of two girls. 17,22
    They are great kids.

    Thank you so much for your courage and love.

    Your willingness to be a tool of God. And your aspirations to make the most of what you have gone through for the good of the world.
    I was able to feel that. And it brought so much strength.

    I don’t want my illness to be the cop out for running.
    I want to lead a life in a way only l who has this illness can do.

    I’m looking forward to your future posting.

    Actually I haven’t started the medical treatment for bipolar yet.
    I got this diagnosis 2weeks ago.

    Still lots of part of me can not accept what I heard.

    I’m debating whether or not to start meds
    It would be helpful if you have some advice.

    ^_^
    Love
    Naoko

    Like

  3. I admire your honesty regarding your revelation of your bipolar disease. It is hard for me to admit even to my closest friends, that my own father was bipolar I was always afraid that others would judge me. (Of course this was in the dark ages of mental asylums and electric shock treatments.) My Lord provided the escape and the love I desperately needed from a father figure. He truly provides an escape (1 Corinthians 10:13) for an abundant life no matter how dreary our pathway might seem. Blessings for continued strength my new friend,

    Like

  4. Just discovered your blog from a mutual friend. Everything you are speaking of directly resonates with my life. I have bipolar . I have been miss diagnosed for 30 years. Never on the correct medication. I am currently working on a total detox of meds and should be med free by February. I am also a runner😀. I will continue to read your insightful words as I am in a deep place of struggle. Thank you for your determination in bringing light to the darkness of mental illness.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your comment. I know what it’s like to be misdiagnosed. I was first treated for major depression and put on antidepressants which triggered mania and from there the fight to try to find the right med cocktail began. I wish you the best. It can be difficult to deal with and manage but it is possible. Don’t forget that! And keep running! When I keep running it definitely helps stabilize me.

      Liked by 1 person

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